Coconut Lime Chicken : Cook

Coconut Lime Chicken

While perusing Pinterest, I came across an Indonesian inspired chicken dish by Menu Musings. Never one to leave well enough alone, I made some changes,  To make things juicier, I went for thighs rather than breasts (that sounds dirty). To spice things up, I added a chopped Habañero to the marinade, If you don’t like things quite so spicy, you can use a Serrano or jalapeño pepper, or leave the pepper out completely.

Coconut Lime Chicken

Ingredients

  • 6 boneless. skinless chicken thighs
  • 3 Tbsp canola oil
  • zest and juice of 1 large lime
  • 1 Habañero pepper, finely minced (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons curry powder
  • ¾ cup canned coconut milk
  • 1 cup chicken stock or low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Procedure

  1. Place chicken thighs in a one gallon zip-top bag.
  2. Combine canola oil, line zest and juice, Habañero pepper, cumin, soy sauce, kosher salt, sugar, curry powder, coconut milk in a small bowl
  3. Pour marinade over the chicken and refrigerate 2 hours up to overnight
  4. Preheat oven to 350°
  5. Using tongs, remove chicken from marinade and arrange in a 9 X 13 inch glass dish. Bake in preheated oven until done, about 30 minutes.
  6. While chicken is baking, combine marinade and stock in a small saucepan. Bring it to a full boil over medium-high heat for 3 to 5 minutes, until reduced by about one-third.
  7. In skillet or sauté pan. sauté  onions in vegetable oil until translucent. Combine sautéed onions with sauce
  8. Spoon sauce over chicken and sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Serve.

Wine For Beginners : Friday Infographic

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Wine is delicious. But learning about it can be daunting. Especially when you hear an oenophile waxing poetic about the nose, color and tastes of different wines.

What’s a wine newbie to do? Winefolly has put all the basics of buying, serving and drinking wine into one jam-packed infographic. This infographic (which is also available as a print) has all the things: types of wines, deciphering a wine label, serving temperatures…okay seriously it covers too much to list.  Peruse this handy guide and sip like a pro!

Basic Wine 101 Guide

 

 

Easy Carnitas Recipe—FEAST

Originally posted on CookDrinkFeast:

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I was perusing the “Manager’s Special” section in the meat department of my local mega-mart this past weekend and found some ‘country-style’ boneless ribs. Country-style ribs aren’t ribs at all. They are sliced pork shoulder and need to be cooked long, low and slow.

I usually make North Carolina style Pulled Pork from pork shoulder. But I wanted to do something different this time. Carnitas is Mexico’s version of pulled pork. It makes for an awesome taco filling. The traditional method of making carnitas involves simmering chunks of pork in lard in a copper cauldron. Most of us don’t have a few gallons of lard hanging around—or a copper cauldron for that matter. Never fear, Serious Eats came up with an excellent alternative method that cooks pork shoulder low and slow in a casserole in the oven.

After reading the recipe and comments, I made a couple of changes. While the pork…

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Las Rocas Garnacha : Drink Wine Wednesday Review

Las Rocas Garnacha

Las Rocas
2011
 Garnacha
Calatayud, Spain
Price: $12.99

Garnacha is the Spanish name for the Granche grape. Garnacha is the second most planted grape in Spain. The most planted grape is Tempranillo.

Las Rocas Garnacha is garnet in color. At 14.8% abv, it’s very high in alcohol. The high alcohol content is evident on the nose. Once the scent of alcohol blows off, it yields cherries and raspberries. The palate is also initially hot, but eventually develops black cherries and blackberries. This wine is very drinkable and plays nicely with food.

What’s in your glass? Let me know in the comments!

Mexican Pickled Onions : Cook Quickie

Mexican Pickled OnionThese simple pickled onions are a perfect complement to carnitas.

Mexican Pickled Onions

Ingredients

  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns

Procedure

  1. Combine ingredients in a glass jar. Make sure vinegar covers the onions.
  2. Place lid on jar.
  3. Shake well
  4. Refrigerate 3 hours or overnight

Easy Carnitas Recipe—FEAST

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I was perusing the “Manager’s Special” section in the meat department of my local mega-mart this past weekend and found some ‘country-style’ boneless ribs. Country-style ribs aren’t ribs at all. They are sliced pork shoulder and need to be cooked long, low and slow.

I usually make North Carolina style Pulled Pork from pork shoulder. But I wanted to do something different this time. Carnitas is Mexico’s version of pulled pork. It makes for an awesome taco filling. The traditional method of making carnitas involves simmering chunks of pork in lard in a copper cauldron. Most of us don’t have a few gallons of lard hanging around—or a copper cauldron for that matter. Never fear, Serious Eats came up with an excellent alternative method that cooks pork shoulder low and slow in a casserole in the oven.

After reading the recipe and comments, I made a couple of changes. While the pork was in the oven, I made pickled red onions. The result was juicy, crispy, porky goodness. The pickled onions were a perfect complement

Easy Carnitas
serves 4 to 6, active time 45 minutes, total time 4 1/2 hours

Ingredients

  • 2 medium onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 3 pounds boneless country-style ribs— cut into 2-inch cubes
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium orange
  • 6 cloves garlic, split in half
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick, broken into three or four pieces
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 6 medium tomatillos (about 1 1/2 pounds), peeled and split in half
  • 2 jalapeño peppers, split in half lengthwise, stem removed
  • 3 limes, cut into wedges
  • 1 cup crumbled queso fresco or feta
  • 24 corn tortillas

Procedures

  1.  Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 275 degrees. Cut one onion into fine dice and combine with cilantro. Refrigerate until needed. Split remaining onion into quarters. Set aside. Season pork chunks with 1 tablespoon salt and place in a 9 by 13 glass casserole dish. The pork should fill the dish with no spaces. Split orange into quarters and squeeze juice over pork. Nestle squeezed orange pieces into casserole. Add 2 onion quarters, 4 cloves garlic, bay leaves, and cinnamon stick to casserole. Nestle everything into an even layer. Pour vegetable oil over surface. Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and place in oven. Cook until pork is fork tender, about 3 1/2 hours.
  2.  Using tongs, remove orange peel, onion, garlic, cinnamon stick, and bay leaves from pork. Transfer pork and liquid to a fine mesh strainer that is resting on a bowl. Let drain for 10 minutes. Transfer the pork to a large skillet (cast iron is best). You should end up with about 1-1½ cup liquid and 1 cup fat. Using a flat spoon or de-fatter, skim fat from surface and add back to pork along with a half cup of liquid. Shred pork into large chunks with fingers or two forks. Season to taste with salt. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Transfer remaining liquid to medium saucepot.
  3.  Add tomatillos, remaining 2 onion quarters, remaining 2 garlic cloves, and jalapeños to sauce pot with strained pork liquid. Add water until it is about 1-inch below the top of the vegetables. Bring to a boil, uncovered, over high heat, then reduce to a simmer, and cook until all of the vegetables are completely tender, about 10 minutes. Blend salsa with hand blender, or in a stand-up blender or food processor until smooth. Season to taste with salt. Allow the salsa to cool and refrigerate until ready to use.
  4.  To serve: Place skillet on the stove over medium heat. Heat the pork until crispy on the bottom, about 6 minutes. Then stir with a spoon to expose new bits to the heat. Allow the meat to crisp on the bottom again, then remove it from the heat and cover it loosely with aluminum foil.
  5.  Meanwhile, heat tortillas. Preheat an 8-inch non-stick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Working one tortilla at a time, dip tortilla in bowl filled with water. Transfer to hot skillet and cook until water evaporates from first side and tortilla is browned in spots, about 30 seconds. Flip and cook until dry, about 15 seconds longer. Transfer tortilla to a tortilla warmer, or wrap in a clean dishtowel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.
  6. To eat, stack two tortillas on top of each other. Add two to three tablespoons carnitas mixture to center. Top with salsa verde, chopped onions and cilantro, queso fresco, and pickled red onion. Serve with lime wedges

White Wine Cheat Sheet: Feast Your Eyes Friday

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Last week, I came out as a redhead. That’s not to say I don’t enjoy and occasional white wine. Sometimes the meal—or the mood—calls for it. I like to drink a sweeter white wine when I’m eating spicy food, such as Szechuan or Thai. If I’m hanging out and sipping wine on a hot summer day, I might opt for something fruity and dry.

This cheat sheet gives a quick breakdown of the flavor profile of some popular white wine varieties.

What’s in your glass these days? Let me know in the comments!

White Wine Cheat Sheet